MISSISSIPPI
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Looking for summer fun in Mississippi? Check out this list

Looking for something to do this summer? The Mississippi Development Authority’s Tourism Division has compiled a list of suggestions.

“Both locals and visitors alike are looking for ways to enjoy summer getaways and recreational options without spending a lot of money,” Malcolm White, director of the MDA’s Tourism Division, said in a news release. “Mississippi offers a variety of free activities that are family-friendly and easy to enjoy during a weekend road trip or a longer vacation stay.”

Here’s some of the MDA’s suggestions of free things you can visit in Mississippi.

Causeyville General Store, Meridian area
The Causeyville General Store, just south of Meridian, was opened in 1895 as a general store and gristmill. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and has many original fixtures and working gristmill. Explore the interesting mechanical music collection, country and movie memorabilia. Hot roasted peanuts, glass bottle Coca-Cola and old-fashioned hoop cheese are local favorites and available for purchase.

Civil War Interpretive Center, Corinth
Located at the site of Battery Robinett, a Union fort that fell to a Confederate attack during the Battle of Corinth, the Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center is one of the finest Civil War facilities in America. Exhibits include a reconstructed fort. Outside the center is a sculpture entitled “Stream of History” with water and stone tracing the flow of time from the founding of the U.S. through the end of the Civil War.

Lower Mississippi Riverfront Museum and Interpretive Site, Vicksburg
Opening August 24, the museum is the first of its kind in the U.S., as it will be the first and only museum to maintain and house a fully restored, dry docked riverboat. It will house interactive displays about the Mississippi River and the Corps of Engineers. Exhibits will include a look at daily life aboard a boat.

Windsor_Ruins_03Ruins of Windsor, Near Port Gibson
One of the most interesting places to take photographs in Mississippi is located just outside of Port Gibson at the Ruins of Windsor. Twenty-three of the 45-foot columns of this mansion are all that remain of this mansion that was completed in 1861 and the subsequent fire that destroyed it. The tall columns provide a stunning view into the past of the size and scope of this structure constructed 150 years ago. Both Union and Confederate troops used the home during the Civil War, and while the home survived during that time, Windsor met its demise from a careless smoking accident in 1890.

Armed Forces Museum, Near Hattiesburg
The Mississippi Armed Forces Museum, located at Camp Shelby just south of Hattiesburg, serves as the military history museum for the state. The museum honors the service and sacrifices of men and women in all branches of the Armed Forces from Mississippi, and from other parts of the country who trained in Mississippi during times of war. Interesting, state-of- the-art exhibits provide real stories of personal experiences and give insight and historical perspective to future generations.

Historic Downtown Walking Tour, Greenwood
Explore the 34 stops of downtown Greenwood on a walking tour that will give you firsthand exploration of this unique Delta city. Walk across the river on Keesler Bridge on Fulton Street, see several churches, the Viking Range Corporation’s International Training Center and many other sites of commerce and historical significance. You might even catch a glimpse of locations used in the soon-to-be-released major motion picture, “The Help,” which was filmed in and around Greenwood.

Old Capitol Museum, Jackson
Honoring one of the most historic buildings in the state, the Old State Capitol building in downtown Jackson has been restored to its original grandeur as a museum to showcase the events that took place here. Interactive, multimedia exhibits bring to life the history of the building as well as the importance of the building in the past and today.

Shearwater Pottery, Ocean Springs
Founded in 1928 by Peter Anderson, Shearwater Pottery has produced art pottery, utilitarian ware, figurines, decorative tiles and other pottery pieces. Crafted using two distinct clay bodies, the cast pieces are hand-painted or originally decorated. Visit the Shearwater Pottery Showroom which is the only retail outlet for Shearwater’s Pottery.

Lauren Rogers Museum of Art, Laurel
Opened in 1923 as a memorial to Lauren Eastman Rogers, the museum is a Georgia Revival structure with additions made in 1925 and 1983, which now encompasses 22,000 square feet. Collections on display at the museum include European Art, American Art, Native American Art, Japanese Woodblock Prints, British Georgian Silver and others.

Rowan Oak, Oxford
Home to Pulitzer prize-winning author William Faulkner for more than 40 years, Rowan Oak was originally built in 1844 and includes 29 acres of land just south of downtown Oxford. The home and the surrounding grounds are interesting and scenic any time of the year, including an alley of cedar trees lining the main driveway. In the home, see where Faulkner sketched an outline on the walls of a room for his book, A Fable.

Elvis Presley Birthplace, Tupelo
There’s a host of things to see and do free of charge to experience the full scope of the birthplace of the King of Rock ‘n Roll: fountain of life, walk of life, exteriors of the family home and church, “Elvis at 13” statue, antique car exhibit, story wall, signature wall and more– all without any costs.

To learn more, visit http://www.VisitMississippi.org and click on “EVENTS.”

Got a comment? E-mail me at endyanna@earthlink.com or Tweet me at @lareecarucker.

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